WOOD ROYD (OZ/ES04)

Click here to see preliminary management plan for the site

Click here to see species lists for this site

General Information

Grid Reference

SK28309790

Ownership

Elliot (?)

Size

0.95 hectares (perimeter 648 metres)

Designation(s)

Open Space Area

Access

Full public access. Public right of way No 31 runs through the site from the southern entrance at Carr Road to the northern end exiting out at a lorry park and onto Manchester Road.

Classification

D3

Importance

A small parcel of woodland that, in spite of all the past industrial activity, has managed to retain a remnant of ancient woodland indicator plants such as bluebell and opposite-leaved golden saxifrage.

Date Surveyed

11 & 12-03-00

 

Note: the code numbers of the photographs below relate to the locations shown on the map near the bottom of the page - they are not in sequence

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Survey information

Introduction

A unique site that has suffered from neglect and misuse for many years. The woodland shows signs of being an ancient semi-natural one.

History

The OS Map of 1854 shows the site as an open area with a footpath running more or less the same route as it does today and a dike that was then a continuation of the stream running through Fox Glen. On the eastern part of the site is marked a coal pit. The remains of this pit are indicated by a bowl-shaped depression in this part of the woodland. At some time in the latter half of the nineteenth century a tramway connection was built through the western part of the site. This was to link Haywood junction (and a line to Henholmes brickworks) on the north side of Manchester Road with Gannister and brickworks just south west of the site. Spoil from this works probably contributed to the steepness of the southwest part of the woodland (woodland with birch, willow and ash). The tramway is shown on the OS map of 1931 and probably not long after this year was dismantled. Just to the north of the site the map describes today's lorry park as a 'hive yard'. 

Topography

Generally situated in a north facing valley and slopes down to the north. Steep sided on the western side as one emerges from the footpath (and housing area on the eastern side) into the wood. A polluted stream emanates from a wall to follow a course parallel with the path until the path veers east to cross the stream via a metal rail footbridge. The path continues to wind round resuming a northerly course again parallel with the stream and out into a lorry park. The stream cuts a deeper course in its northern part. North of the footbridge another stream flows from a culvert (a continuation of the stream running through Fox Glen) to join the main stream to disappear down a culvert that takes the stream to the Little Don. The south and southeastern part of the wood lies in a bowl-shaped depression (where a mine was located) and is bounded by housing (with the lorry park to the north).

 

Recreation and Use

The site is taking on the likes of a tip with much rubbish accumulating on the steeper western slopes (adjacent to an industrial area). A rope swing from a tree indicates informal play by kids. The public footpath is used as a shortcut to the main road through Deepcar & Stocksbridge. 

Present Management

None, except vegetation clearance for footpath.

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Main Plant Communities

Community

General Description

Characteristic Species

Community A

Ash-dominated woodland

Fraxinus excelsior

Community B

Mixed deciduous woodland

Hyacinthoides non-scriptus, Coryllus avellana, Holcus mollis, Hedera helix, Pteridium aquilinum

Community C

Streamside community

Pelia epiphylla, Marchantia sp. (liverworts), Cardamine sp. (bittercress), Chrysosplenium oppositifolium

Community D

Tall herb

Rubus fruticosus agg., Urtica dioica, Galium aparine, Chamerion angustifolium, Eurynchium praelongum

Community E

Mono-dominant stands of bistort

Persicaria sp.

Community F

Willow and birch scrub

Salix caprea, Betula sp.

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Ecological Interest

This woodland has been much modified and shaped by past industrial (and present) activity. The route of the old tramway is difficult to trace within the site. However, if one identifies areas where bluebell and other ancient woodland indicators occur (on the west and northwest part of the site) the sharply defined boundary that emerges between these and the areas that have an obvious history of disturbance correlate quite well with the map evidence.

Much of the ecological value is in the least disturbed areas. The northwestern part has a range of trees and shrubs and ground flora such as oak and hazel, bluebell, ferns, inlcuding a small area of bracken (along the northwest boundary wall) and has been identified as Compartment B.

The southern part of the site is a linear feature that runs parallel with a footpath starting from Carr Road. As a result of its proximity to housing this feature (situated on the western side of the path) contains a range of garden 'throwaways' or ones deliberately planted. These include mock orange (Philadelphus), Hebe, lilac, London pride and Columbine (Aquilegia). Away from this boundary is a strip of willow, birch scrub that further to the north merges into a steep sided pioneer woodland with much ash.

Opposite this area is a stream course that emerges from a culvert at the back of a house adjacent to footpath. The water is fairly well polluted, possibly from damaged sewage outflows with scum accumulation on the water surface and a characteristic odour. A stream side community has identified with moss and liverwort cover abundant. Unfortunately, Japanese knotweed has colonised the eastern side of the stream below the footbridge (taking the public footpath across to the eastern side of the stream to emerge out into a lorry park).

Another introduction present on the site is the garden variety of yellow archangel that has silvery leaves, concentrated in a small area, along a wall, parallel to the stream south of the footbridge. Some plants, especially later on in the season, appear to loose the silveriness of leaves and look almost identical to the woodland type.

There are areas of bluebell that are sporadically distributed along the stream north of the footbridge where another stream joins this from the northwest of the site (and is a continuation of the one flowing through Fox Glen).  The stream, bounded on either side by some large ash and sycamore trees, flows down a culvert at the top end of the site. The eastern part of the site contains tall herb, much of it dominated by bramble and scattered areas of bluebell, with creeping soft grass and mono-dominant stands of bistort.

Wood Royd is currently not recognised as a site containing ecological interest within the Sheffield UDP. In view of the interest it clearly has (and the potential to enhance this), it is suggested that the next review of the UDP should designate this as an Area of Natural History Interest.

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Botanical Survey - to view lists of species click here

Stocksbridge SRB5 Greenspace Audit undertaken by Jim Flanagan for Sheffield Wildlife Trust - see their Community Action Handbook - full of good ideas for your local site


Back to map of ecological survey sites

Inner Zone

Knoll Top

Outer Zone

Oxley Park

Bracken Moor - playing fields

East Whitwell - open space

Wood Royd

Countryside Zone

Ellen Cliff Wood

Townend Common

Industrial Zone

Dog Lichen Field

Hen Holmes Wood

Little Don - acid heath

Little Don - open space

Exchange Sidings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I
Back to map of ecological survey sites

nner Zone

Knoll Top

Outer Zone

Oxley Park

Bracken Moor - playing fields

East Whitwell - open space

Wood Royd

Countryside Zone

Ellen Cliff Wood

Townend Common

Industrial Zone

Dog Lichen Field

Hen Holmes Wood

Little Don - acid heath

Little Don - open space

Exchange Sidings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I
Back to map of ecological survey sites

nner Zone

Knoll Top

Outer Zone

Oxley Park

Bracken Moor - playing fields

East Whitwell - open space

Wood Royd

Countryside Zone

Ellen Cliff Wood

Townend Common

Industrial Zone

Dog Lichen Field

Hen Holmes Wood

Little Don - acid heath

Little Don - open space

Exchange Sidings

 

 

 

 

 

 


Back to map of ecological survey sites

Inner Zone

Knoll Top

Outer Zone

Oxley Park

Bracken Moor - playing fields

East Whitwell - open space

Wood Royd

Countryside Zone

Ellen Cliff Wood

Townend Common

Industrial Zone

Dog Lichen Field

Hen Holmes Wood

Little Don - acid heath

Little Don - open space

Exchange Sidings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I
Back to map of ecological survey sites

nner Zone

Knoll Top

Outer Zone

Oxley Park

Bracken Moor - playing fields

East Whitwell - open space

Wood Royd

Countryside Zone

Ellen Cliff Wood

Townend Common

Industrial Zone

Dog Lichen Field

Hen Holmes Wood

Little Don - acid heath

Little Don - open space

Exchange Sidings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I
Back to map of ecological survey sites

 

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